Thursday, February 03, 2005

Journal 2: Web Stuff (Orality and Literacy)

Hey guys,
I believe I was supposed to find some links to sites about orality and literacy. I use the word "believe" because this journal entry is way past due and I'm just now getting to it. How's that for honesty? Anyways, I did some looking around the web and found some good sites. I had to look up just orality, otherwise I got a bunch of papers written by students who are probably much smarter than we are. Because they made me feel stupid, I chose not to include them on this entry. Besides, they probably can't sing Neon Moon as good as I can. Anyways, the first sight I found seems to be written either about Ong or by Ong, I'm not sure. It comes from the University of Georgia, and Georgia has some good things to offer....ughmm, like myself! Well this sight speaks of Ong and is entitled Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the World. It has to do with how writing came and in some people's opinion, i.e. Plato, brought a horrible death with it. I might agree with Plato. I liked it much better in a time when writing wasn't around. We were forced to memorize everything. Now that writing has come around, we are much more detached from our original works (that last statement was on the webpage). But back to my argument, if we did not have writing, we would have to remember everything, thus exercising our minds to their fullest extent. If you couldn't memorize very well, and were a stupid person, you could just pretend to be listening to people and act smart. Be the strong silent type.
Here's the address for that site: http://www.coe.uga.edu/reading/faculty/dreinking/ONG.html

Another site I looked at that may be useful is one that is a review of Orality and Literacy. This is the book we're looking at in class. It's pretty interesting, and you might find it helpful that it has a summary of the chapters in the book. These summaries point out the main points in the chapter. I am, however, not condoning the reading of the chapter summary as a legitimate review of the chapter.
Here's the address: http://www.engl.niu.edu/wac/ong_rvw.html
Well, I think that's it today. Let me know if you agree with me and Plato.

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